School Papers

“The a married woman, but Edna was becoming

“The Awakening” was created during a time where women had no equal rights as much as the men. Chopin shows the way women were treated, judge, misleads, and confused. Chopin utilizes Edna as a sacrifice for all women, by showing how daring Edna becomes throughout the story. During these modern times women were being raised to cook, clean and take care of the children and their husbands. Women had to stay in the house. If a woman left the house and came back later the dawn then she would be judge and looked down upon. The men had no respect for their women. In “The Awakening” Leonce tells Edna “You are burnt beyond recognition,” giving hint that he finds dislike to the way she looks. Also in “The Awakening” Leonce leaves and misses dinner, woman at those time were not allowed to question a man about his were bouts. Edna allows Leonce to do as he pleases but in the back of her mind she has some one she wants to be. Edna is not seen as the “perfect mother” that she should be or desires to be. “He approached his wife with her inattention, her habitual neglect of the children. If it was not a mother’s place to look out for the children then who on earth was it” Leonce says to Edna. Edna was not being the “perfect mother” everyone assumed a woman should be. The outside woman soon started to judge her once they seen her flirting with Robert. At the time woman should only speak to another man outside of her marriage if her husband is around, or/and she being told to do something for him. Everyone was not pleased with seeing how much liking Edna and Robert were taking into each other, considering the fact she is a married woman, but Edna was becoming free she was finding her true self through Robert. Robert and Edna had fun times together, but the women of the Grand Isle see it as Robert is playfully flirting with her. No one ever found the clue that Robert is Edna’s Awakening. Women were not even allowed to travel or go to the beach with other males. Woman of the Grand Isle respected that modern rule of society. Edna always questioned in the back of her that how could living like this be right. Even in society a woman doing as they please or following their heart was not ok.  Edna becomes rebellious by leaving her husband leonce and having a fair not caring about society over view anymore. Edna stood for the entire woman in reality society. Woman were confused on rather to react off of how they felt or the way society wanted them to. Edna started to act off of how she felt. Women never had the courage to leave their men. Wanted the same equal rights. According to http://www.loyno.edu/~kchopin/new/women/motherhood.html “In the later nineteenth century things for women began to change” “No doubt this had something to do with modernity and its intrinsic insistence on change, and no doubt it had something to do with the actions of women themselves, with their desire to break out of the limits imposed on their sex.”  In “The Awakening” there were two birds; one that was caged and the other were able to fly freely. Those birds were represented the women of those times. Women were caged not able to experience their inner selves, when you have Edna that was able to fight society and become free. “One of the most significant changes to American culture in the late nineteenth century was the shift in women’s roles. In addition to the anxiety experienced by most Americans as a result of rapid industrialization, advice givers, like Catharine Beecher and Sara Hale, were concerned that the home was no longer considered sacred and women were not being appreciated for their role maintaining,” stated  by http://www.loyno.edu/~kchopin/new/women/motherhood.html. After all Kate Chopin being the author of “The Awakening” was even brave for her. She did what no other woman author was brave enough to do during this time. She put her government name as a state of saying things need to change. She wanted her equal rights.  Chopin was the sacrifice for women in reality, but used Edna as a fiction to show to women how freely they were able to be. They did not have to be mistreated, judge, mislead, and confused.